The Online Digital Photo Help center

CP+ 2019: Voigtländer shows new manual focus lenses for Sony E-mount and Leica M

CP+ 2019: Voigtländer shows new manual focus lenses for Sony E-mount and Leica M


CP+ 2019: Voigtländer shows new lenses for Sony E-mount

CP+ 2019: Voigtländer shows new manual focus lenses for Sony E-mount and Leica M 1

We’re at the CP+ show in Yokohama, Japan, where Cosina is letting customers get their hands on three fast manual-focus primes for Sony E-mount and Leica M, respectively. We took a closer look.

Nokton 50mm F1.2 Aspherical

CP+ 2019: Voigtländer shows new manual focus lenses for Sony E-mount and Leica M 2

First up is the Nokton 50mm F1.2 Aspherical for E-mount. Although this is a metal-bodies, classically-styles manual focus prime, optical construction is thoroughly modern, comprising eight elements in six groups, including two aspheres.

Nokton 50mm F1.2 Aspherical

CP+ 2019: Voigtländer shows new manual focus lenses for Sony E-mount and Leica M 3

Considering the fast maximum aperture of F1.2, the Nokton is very compact, and fairly light at 434 g. Voigtländer claims that this is thanks to the use of aspherics, which allow for high-resolution imaging wide-open without the need for more, or larger elements.

Nokton 50mm F1.2 Aspherical

CP+ 2019: Voigtländer shows new manual focus lenses for Sony E-mount and Leica M 4

The Nokton 50mm F1.2 features a 12-bladed manual aperture, and a 58mm filter ring. Electrical contacts on the mount allow for focal length and aperture information to be transmitted to compatible E-mount cameras. Minimum focus distance is 0.45m (about 18 inches).

Nokton 21mm F1.4 Aspherical

CP+ 2019: Voigtländer shows new manual focus lenses for Sony E-mount and Leica M 5

The Nokton 21mm F1.4 for Sony E-mount handles like a slightly larger version of the 50mm, and operates in exactly the same way. Manual focus and aperture rings allow for direct manual control, and the overall quality of build and finish is as high as we would expect from a premium Voigtländer lens. All three of these new lenses, in fact, are lovely to hold and use.

Nokton 21mm F1.4 Aspherical

CP+ 2019: Voigtländer shows new manual focus lenses for Sony E-mount and Leica M 6

Optical construction comprises 13 elements in 11 groups, with at least one aspherical element (Cosina is being a little vague, for now, on the exact optical formulation). Like the Nokton 50mm, there are 12 aperture blades, and electrical contacts communicate focal length and aperture to the camera.

Nokton 21mm F1.4 Aspherical

CP+ 2019: Voigtländer shows new manual focus lenses for Sony E-mount and Leica M 7

The Nokton 21mm F1.4 is a fairly large lens, with a 62mm filter thread. For video use, the aperture dial can be ‘de-clicked’ for smooth stepless control. Minimum focus is 0.25m (about 10 inches).

Nokton ‘Vintage’ 75mm F1.5 Aspherical

CP+ 2019: Voigtländer shows new manual focus lenses for Sony E-mount and Leica M 8

The Nokton 21mm F1.4 Aspherical is a fast short telephoto prime lens for Leica M-mount. Preferred by some rangefinder photographers over 80mm+ lenses for portraiture, 75mm is meaningfully longer than 50mm, while not quite long enough that the framelines in an optical viewfinder end up too small for accurate composition.

Nokton ‘Vintage’ 75mm F1.5 Aspherical

CP+ 2019: Voigtländer shows new manual focus lenses for Sony E-mount and Leica M 9

Intended to recall the classic rangefinder lenses of the mid 20th Century, the Nokton 75mm might look like an antique, but its optical makeup is entirely modern. Optical construction comprises seven elements in six groups, including one aspherical element. According to Voigtländer, this should ensure good sharpness and resolution even at the lens’ widest aperture of F1.5.

CP+ 2019: Voigtländer shows new manual focus lenses for Sony E-mount and Leica M 10

Again, there are 12 aperture blades, which ensures near-circular apertures across the range of F1.5-16. At wide and medium apertures, this should result in the all-important pleasant circular highlight bokeh beloved of portrait photographers. As we’d expect for a lens designed for rangefinder cameras, minimum focus is a fairly unremarkable 0.7m, which represents the minimum focus coupling distance for a Leica M-series camera.

Pricing and availability for all three new lenses has yet to be confirmed, but we’ll bring you more details as they become available.



Source link


Subscribe to get this amazing EBOOK FREE

By subscribing to this newsletter you agree to our Privacy Policy